What is Rolex Everose Gold? A Complete Guide

Rolex Everose gold

What is Rolex Everose Gold? A Complete Guide

If you have done your research and browsed some Rolex watches, you can’t help but have come across the term ”Everose Gold”. Just like all of Rolex’s own-made, proprietary materials, Rolex heavily use the names in their communication in order to highlight that it is developed and owned by Rolex.

But what exactly is Rolex Everose Gold? Let’s look closer at this material.

What is Rolex Everose Gold?

Rolex Evorose gold can most easily be described as rose gold. Unlike standard yellow gold, rose gold is not 100% gold. In fact, Rose gold is generally a mixture of classic yellow gold, silver, and copper metals. Rose gold is sometimes also known as pink gold due to its pink hue

But standard yellow gold in the context of watches is not 100% gold either. The gold used in Rolex watches (and pretty much any gold watch) is 18K, which means its 75% gold by weight no matter what color it is. The color variation occurs as a result of the different materials used in composing the other 25% of the alloy.

24K (100%) gold is almost never used in jewelry for durability reasons.

But what does Rolex’s own proprietary rose gold alloy – Everose gold – look like?

Of course, being Rolex, it’s not just any rose gold we are talking about here.

Rolex first introduced the Everose gold in 2005. Rolex has used rose gold for its watches long before this, but the alloy used has not been their own. We should bear in mind here that Rolex is the only watch brand that has its very own foundry. This gives Rolex great advantages of research and development for new alloys. 

Rolex Yachtmaster 116655

The primary element in rose gold that gives it its pink hue is copper, but the issue is that copper can change color over time, in particular, when in regular and repeated contact with corrosives such as saltwater, and particularly chlorine. Over time, this can make rose gold lose its original luster. And being Rolex, which strives to make ”Perpetual” products, which are meant to look the same for decades to come, regular rose gold simply wasn’t good enough.


”18 CT EVEROSE GOLD – AN EXCLUSIVE PATENT

To preserve the beauty of its pink gold watches, Rolex created and patented an exclusive 18 ct pink gold alloy cast in its own foundry: Everose gold. Introduced in 2005, 18 ct Everose is used on all Rolex Oyster models in pink gold.”


Rolex needed a rose gold that would keep its original sheen, hue, and luster for decades to come. Rolex’s answer to this is Everose gold.

Everose gold is a mixture of pure gold mixed with copper and platinum. According to Rolex, this alloy will never lose its red color. It is thanks to the platinum that the color is maintained. And according to Rolex, its color will not be affected by any external factors, which is an issue otherwise.  Everose gold contains at least 76% gold and slightly more than 2% platinum. With Rolex’s secretive way of conducting its business, that is as detailed information about the alloy’s ingredients as you get. Like all other gold alloys, the Everose gold is made by Rolex in its own foundry.

The first model to be made in Everose gold was the Daytona.

Rose gold is sometimes perceived as a metal primarily for women, but this is certainly not the case. In particular, when we are talking about the rose gold from Rolex. 

Rolex’s proprietary Everose gold is quite toned-down and subdued, which makes it quite discreet. Much more discreet than the bold and bright yellow gold. As such, this is why people who prefer a more discreet look opt for versions made in Everose gold. It is a metal chosen by both men and women – and which looks equally good on both genders.

Main photo property of Rolex. This article is written for informational purposes.

4 thoughts on “What is Rolex Everose Gold? A Complete Guide

  1. The everose gold is beautiful

    1. It is indeed a beautiful material for Rolex watches! Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

      Kind regards,
      Millenary Watches

  2. Just a small correction:
    “Unlike standard yellow gold, rose gold is not 100% gold.”
    “Standard yellow gold” in the context of watches is not 100% gold either. The gold used in Rolex watches (and pretty much any gold watch) is 18K, which means its 75% gold by weight no matter what colour it is. The colour variation occurs as a result of the different materials used in composing the other 25% of the alloy.

    24K (100%) gold is almost never used in jewelry for durability reasons.

    1. Thank you for the well-summarized info of gold. We just added it to the end of this article

      Many thanks again!

      Kind regards,
      Millenary Watches

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